Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PPMS) is a type of multiple sclerosis that affects the nervous system. It differs from other types of MS because it progresses slowly and steadily from the beginning, rather than having unpredictable attacks and periods of remission.

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Symptoms may include problems with balance, vision, coordination, speech, and thinking. There is no known cure for PPMS, but treatments are available to help manage signs.

Is PPMS more severe than the relapsing forms of MS?

People with relapsing forms of MS often experience periods of remission where they feel relatively healthy. PPMS is different because it progresses slowly and steadily from the beginning, rather than having unpredictable attacks and periods of remission.

Some people might wonder if PPMS is more serious than the relapsing forms of MS.

While there is no known cure for PPMS, treatments are available to help control symptoms. Many people with PPMS live long, full lives.

Symptoms of Primary Progressive MS

Signs of PPMS can vary from person to person, but often include problems with balance, vision, coordination, speech, and thinking. Some people may also experience issues with their spinal cord. Working with a doctor to develop a treatment plan that helps limit symptoms is important.

There is no known cure for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), but ministrations are available to help control symptoms. Many people with PPMS live long, full lives. Signs can vary from person to person, but often include problems with balance, vision, coordination, speech, and thinking.

Some people may also experience issues with their spinal cord. Working with a doctor to develop a treatment plan that helps manage symptoms is important.

There is no known cure for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), but solutions are available to help control symptoms. Many people with PPMS live long, full lives. Signs can vary from person to person, but often include problems with balance, vision, coordination, speech, and thinking.

Symptoms may include:

  • Numbness and Tingling
  • Weakness in limbs
  • Unsteadiness
  • Bladder problems
  • Visual deficiencies
  • Pain in the legs or feet
  • Electric-shock sensations (Lhermitte sign)
  • Paralysis
  • Depression or mood changes
  • Sexual dysfunction

Central Nervous System

There is no known cure for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), but interventions are available to help restrict symptoms. Many people with PPMS live long, full lives. Signs can vary from person to person, but often include problems with balance, vision, coordination, speech, and thinking.

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Primary Progressive MS

People with primary progressive MS may also experience issues with their spinal cord. Working with a doctor to develop a treatment plan that helps in managing symptoms is important. There is no known cure for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), but interventions are available to help manage signs. Many people with PPMS live long, full lives. Symptoms can vary from person to person, but often include problems with balance, vision, coordination, speech, and thinking.

Location of Lesions

The location of exacerbations can be helpful in predicting the prognosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Lesions that are located on the brainstem or spinal cord are more serious and may lead to a poorer prognosis. However, there is still much research to be done in this area. Work with a doctor to develop a treatment plan that helps manage symptoms.

There are many solutions and therapies that can help people with PPMS manage their symptoms. Some people may require physical and occupational therapy to help them stay mobile and independent. Others may need medication to help control their immune system. Working with a doctor to develop a treatment plan that helps manage symptoms is essential.

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Diagnosing Primary Progressive MS

There is no one specific test for diagnosing primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). A doctor will usually start by asking about symptoms and conducting a physical examination. They may also order tests to help rule out other diseases that could be causing the symptoms. Some common tests used to diagnose MS include:

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Spinal Tap
  • Evoked potentials tests

Results of the MRI

The MRI is often used to help diagnose MS. It can help to show sclerosis in the brain that are associated with the disease. In people with PPMS, these lesions may be located on the brainstem or spinal cord.

The results of the Lumbar Puncture

The lumbar puncture, or spinal tap, is a procedure used to collect spinal fluid (CSF) from the spinal cord. This fluid can be tested for signs of MS. A spinal tap is often used to help diagnose MS, especially in people with PPMS who have lesions on the brainstem or brain and spinal cord.

Conquering Chronic Pain – Through Hypnosis (CD)

Through years of clinical practice, Dr Daniel Amen has found great success in treating chronic pain patients by using medical hypnosis. On this audio recording, Dr Amen leads you through a medical hypnosis session.

If you suffer with chronic pain you’re aware of how debilitating it truly is. Chronic pain not only affects your physical body, it has an incredible effect on your emotions.

The Emotional Impact

Being diagnosed with any type of MS can be a difficult experience. For people with PPMS, it can be especially tough to face the fact that their disease will progress slowly and steadily from the beginning. This can lead to feelings of sadness, anxiety, and isolation. It’s important to talk to a therapist or counsellor who can help you cope with these emotions. You can also join a support group for people with MS to connect with others who understand what you’re going through.

The Mental Impact

MS can also have a mental impact. Some people with MS may experience depression, anxiety, or mood changes. It’s important to talk to a doctor if you’re having any mental health symptoms. There are treatments available that can help.

The nervous system plays a crucial role in PPMS. The disease affects the nerves and can cause symptoms such as numbness, tingling, weakness, and unsteadiness. The lesions that are often associated with PPMS can be located on the brainstem or spinal cord. This can lead to a poorer prognosis for some people with the disease.

Making the Diagnosis

The diagnosis of PPMS can be difficult because there is no one specific test. A doctor will usually start by asking about physical symptoms and family history. They may also order tests to help rule out other diseases that could be causing the symptoms.

A doctor may enquire, tactfully, about your brain function. Or if you have trouble walking and if this walking ability is poorer during relapses. Brain fog or poor brain function can be indicative of lesions forming during disease activity.

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Nurse caring for Primary Progressive MS

Possible Treatments

Ocrevus is the only disease-modifying drug known to be effective in treating Primary Progressive MS.

There are several reasons why DMTs might be less successful in treating PPMS.

First, the disease progresses slowly and steadily from the beginning, so DMTs may not be as effective in controlling the disease progression.

Second, the lesions that are often associated with PPMS can be located on the brainstem or brain and spinal cord, which makes it more difficult to treat the disease.

Finally, many people with Primary Progressive MS PPMS do not respond well to DMTs. It is not known what causes primary progressive MS.

Disease Progression

The accepted progression path for people diagnosed with MS of the central nervous system condition to begin as relapsing-remitting MS before advancing to secondary progressive MS after 5 – 15 years. Patients with Primary Progressive MS PPMS will be diagnosed with the condition at this stage.

Primary Progressive MS PPMS

The diagnosis of PPMS differs from a diagnosis of RRMS in several ways.

First, PPMS progresses slowly and steadily from the beginning, while relapsing-remitting MS can have unpredictable attacks and periods of remission.

Second, the lesions that are often associated with PPMS can be located on the brainstem or spine, which makes it more difficult to treat the disease.

Third, many people with primary progressive do not respond well to DMTs.

Finally, there is no known cure for PPMS, while there are treatments available for RRMS.

General Health

Good general health and fitness can help the prognosis of MS in a few ways.

Firstly, regular exercise can help to improve balance and coordination, which can be affected by MS. This can help people with MS to stay mobile and independent.

Secondly, exercise can help to strengthen the immune system, which can be weakened by MS. This can help people with MS to fight off infection and stay healthy.

Thirdly, exercise can help to control weight and improve overall health, which can be affected by MS. This can lead to a better quality of life for people with MS and a slower progression of the disease.

Related Pages

Medicines for Multiple Sclerosis: what you need to know
Ataxia: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments
How to maintain your mental health while living with MS

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Primary Progressive MS